Mark Baisley
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From August of 2009 through January of 2013, McCarty dogged the trail of directives by a series of autocrats that polygraphs alone would be authorized when interviewing defense contractors, prisoners at GITMO, and Afghanistan troops entrenched with American soldiers. A competitive technology, the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer, emerged long after the polygraph method became the established standard. The evidence of McCarty’s research is that the more promising voice analysis technology has been held at bay in a “turf war” by order of the Director of National Intelligence.

This would be an annoying so-what if the result were merely to deny field operators their weapon of choice, e.g. PC versus Mac. But this willful indifference to asset requests may very well have cost American lives. Before its use was prohibited by Director Cambone, appointed by Don Rumsfeld in 2003, and subsequently re-prohibited by James Clapper, appointed by President Obama in 2010, analysts demonstrated far superior effectiveness in Afghanistan and Iraq with the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer. Add The Clapper Memo to Benghazi and Extortion 17 in the list of unsavory decisions made by leaders who do not seem to be engaged in the mission. David Schippers, the former Director U.S. Department of Justice and Chief Investigative Counsel for the Clinton impeachment hearings calls McCarty’s book, “the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years. This is how it’s done.”

My old friend Lyle, while lacking in succinctness, is a sweet man who invests himself in the mission, both at his vocation and his avocation. The consequences of electing a micromanager as president of the state ballroom dance association may be the unjust humiliation of an assiduous engineer and his devoted wife of 40 years. But on the larger stage, far more than self esteem is at risk.

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Mark Baisley

Mark Baisley is a security and intelligence professional