John Ransom

A new prayer from the United Nations disguised as a four-color .pdf says that the weather is all your fault.

‘We now have a better understanding of human-induced climate change,” chants Michel Jarraud, the Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization,“and climate scientists can increasingly determine how large scale pressure and temperature patterns influence the weather.”

The prayer goes on to tie “extreme” weather in 2013 to “human-induced” causes.

I didn’t even know that the weather could read a human-induced calendar.

Can I get an “Amen”?

The material in the report is so good that the WMO dispensed with the customary laugh track that would normally go underneath it.

Because let’s get this part straight: Climate scientists couldn’t spell drought if you spotted them the first five letters. It's so bad they ought to be issuing a red nose and floppy shoes with the degree.

There is no scientific evidence, no creditable reports, which tie extreme weather in 2013 to anything other than the fantasies of liberals.

There’s speculation and there's hypothesis.

But science that proves cause and effect?

No.

And there can’t be.

That’s because according to the exact science of our world economy, 2013 wasn’t extreme at all.

“The reinsurance company Munich Re came out with its annual assessment of natural disasters, and found that 2013 was an unusually quiet year,” writes Time Magazine. “Catastrophes like floods and storms claimed more than 20,000 lives around the world, and caused more than $125 billion in damages. While that’s clearly a lot—and the number of deaths from disasters rose over 2012—both figures are well below the 106,000 in deaths and $184 billion in losses that were experienced on average over the past decade.”

Catch that? 2012 was even less extreme.

If you’re like me, you’re surprised.

I didn’t even know Time Magazine was still published.

So, who are you going to believe: The insurance companies who pay out claims or the meteorologists at the United Nations whose jobs depend on the human-created fantasy of climate change?

One thing that has become abundantly clear in 2103 is that “science” on which the hypothesis of man-made climate change-- sorry, now it's human-induced climate change-- is based, isn’t credible; it’s a faith-based initiative, a religion, the newest opiate for the masses.


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.
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