Tebow Blacklist Isn’t the Beginning, It’s the End

John Ransom
Posted: Feb 03, 2014 12:01 AM
Tebow Blacklist Isn’t the Beginning, It’s the End

While everyone was paying attention to the demise of the U.S. economy, the U.S. workforce, the checks and balances written into the U.S. Constitution, a terrible tragedy has ensued almost unnoticed.

Yes, while the rest of were working to “save” the country from galloping Big Government, the most perfect game in the history of the universe has brought itself to the brink of extinction.

The downfall of the National Football League is imminent

There are many signs and symptoms of the NFL’s impending doom there for the thinking person to see.

The NFL used to have the problem that there was more demand than there was supply of NFL games. But after a half-a-dozen years of expanding distribution, including game replays, games without commercials, games over the Internet and NFL on demand, there’s too much product out there.

And then there’s the almost forgotten fact that the average fan won’t spend the $500 it costs to go to a game.

But that’s not the worst of it.

Their leadership is clueless, too.

Take NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for example.

Here’s a man who wouldn’t be a bad commissioner if he didn’t want to be a commissioner so badly. But he does want to be commissioner so badly that he thinks that HE’s the game.

Goodell is the NFL’s answer to Barack Obama, a guy who thinks that just showing up and being a rock star is his job description.

Roger Goodell is certainly the worst commissioner the NFL has had in my lifetime. He might be the worst commissioner in all ofsports in my lifetime.

Under his lack of leadership, the play on the field is incompressible, with rules so complex and indefinable that the referees are having a tough time calling a clean game.

Rule changes, like those affecting the part of football that has to do with the foot—kickoffs and extra points—have been deemed practically superfluous, without a lot debate, thanks to Goodell.

You gotta get the product right on the field first and foremost, guys.

That’s what the game is about.

But these aren’t the worst things about the trend of the game.

The NFL has allowed politics to be interjected into the game repeatedly, running anti-2nd Amendment commercials on the one hand during the Super Bowl, and rejecting a commercial from a gun manufacturer—who by the way sells a perfectly legal product, guaranteed by the constitution.

But the sellout doesn’t stop there.

It gets worse.

As my friend Bill Rogan, sportscaster for KNUS AM710 Denver has noted: “Quarterbacks Kyle Orton, Curtis Painter, Michael Vick, Rex Grossman, Drew Stanton, Ryan Lindley, Colt McCoy, Tavares Jackson, Jordan Palmer, Shaun Hill, Scott Tolzien, Seneca Wallace, Josh Freeman, Christian Ponder, Matt Cassel, Sean Renfree, Dominique Davis, Derek Anderson, Jimmy Clausen, Luke McCown, Dan Orlovsky, Thad Lewis, Matt Moore, Pat Devlin, David Garrard, Matt Simms, Geno Smith, Mark Sanchez (injured reserve), Tyler Bray, Chase Daniel, Matt McGloin, Terrelle Pryor, Brad Sorensen, Charlie Whitehurst, Tyrod Taylor, Josh Johnson, Zac Robinson, Jason Campbell, Brian Hoyer, Alex Tanney, Brandon Weedon, Bruce Gradkowski, T.J. Yates, Matt Hasselbeck, Ricky Stanzi, Blaine Gabbert, Chad Henne and Rusty Smith were all on NFL rosters this past season. But Tim Tebow wasn't.”

“Well they say Tebow isn't an NFL quarterback. He can't throw. He can't read defenses. He can't play,” Rogan continued. “I'm glad I watched the video to confirm that this guy can't play. He can't complete a pass. He doesn't do anything to help his team win. What a loser. No wonder he wasn't on an NFL roster. All those guys listed above have proven themselves to be NFL greats with highlight reels hours long. Yep, watch the video. This guy can't play.”

He can play. But really he CAN’T play… because he’s Christian.

"And just as I feel compelled to call out the league when it comes to injustices like the dearth of minorities in offensive play-calling roles,” wrote Yahoo NFL writer Michael Silver last year, “the apparent blacklisting of a quarterback who went 7-4 as a starter in 2011 and won a memorable playoff game over the Pittsburgh Steelers doesn't seem kosher to me.”

That’s because it’s not kosher.

Imagine the NFL blacklisting someone who is outspoken about global warming, or anti-poverty programs or women’s and minority issues.

They wouldn’t dream of doing it.

You can rape and abuse a woman, be an accessory to murder, get nailed for doping and as long your play on the field is acceptable, the NFL has a place for you.

But being a Christian?

That’s where they draw the line.

Of course they’re in trouble.

When the game that helped America kill the color barrier has no more room at the stadium for Touchdown Jesus, the end is near.

(P.s. While I was editing this column a commercial for Scientology appeared during the Super Bowl. It’s a good thing the NFL has standards. I rest my case.)