Dave Ramsey

Posted April 14, 2015

My husband and I are 28 years old. Were completely debt-free, and we each have great jobs. We dont talk a lot about this kind of stuff, because weve found it causes other people to treat us differently. We realize how incredibly blessed we have been, so we always try to give God the credit, save, tithe and give regularly, and not brag about these things. How would you recommend handling a situation like ours?

Posted April 07, 2015

Dear Dave, We have two girls in competitive gymnastics, and its costing $12,000 to $15,000 a year at a professional gym to do all this. My wife and I both work, and we make about $115,000 a year, but virtually all of her income goes toward paying the gymnastics bill.

Posted April 03, 2015

Running a business can be scary. You put your heart and soul into your company and cant imagine doing anything else.

Posted March 24, 2015

You want your kids to associate work with money. I still meet people my age and older who havent made that connection.

Posted March 10, 2015

When I made the decision to get intentional with my money, I just used cash. Its hard to spend it when you dont have any on you.

Posted February 24, 2015

Events like this make you realize the need for proper planning, but dont ever prepay for them.

Posted February 14, 2015

We've heard a lot about how far behind Americans are in saving for retirement, but we don't often hear many solutions that the average family can actually afford.

Posted January 27, 2015

Technically, the government would call it passive income. But they dont have anything to do with reality.

Posted January 20, 2015

Years ago when I crashed and burned financially there were a few strong emotions that spurred me towards change. One of those was disgust. The second emotion was fear.

Posted October 22, 2014

As long as you're studying something that has marketplace application, youre setting the stage to make back the money that was put into your degree.

Posted October 07, 2014

You know, a magical thing happens when you pay down a house and sell it somewhere down the road. The money comes back. You didnt lose it.

Posted October 01, 2014

You might be able to justify it if the degree immediately raises income; otherwise you cant afford to make investments in vague educational goals right now.

Posted September 23, 2014

Being a Free Spirit just means you dont major in details. Youre not the number cruncher, and you dont wear a pocket protector. But being a Free Spirit doesnt mean you cant be a grown up.

Posted July 29, 2014

Human beings have a 100 percent mortality rate, okay? No one is getting out of this thing alive. You need a will and a full estate plan with specific instructions.

Posted June 18, 2014

As your money situation improves, you’ll be able to buy more new things. The price of “new” will become a smaller and smaller percentage of your financial world.

Posted June 11, 2014

Timeshares are a horrid, inconvenient product. My sentiment would be, “I’m out of here!”

Posted June 04, 2014

I know this probably sounds mean, but I’m just not a big romantic when it comes to people who are deeply in debt.

Posted April 30, 2014

But the IRS is a different animal altogether. They have virtually unlimited power to collect; so put them at the top of the list and get them paid off as fast as you can!

Posted April 23, 2014

Having a college fund set aside by your parents is really nice, if they can afford that kind of thing. But you can go to school by getting good grades, applying for scholarships, working your tail off and choosing a school you can afford. In short, college funding is not a necessity.