Hugh Johnson: Another FDR Thug

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Posted: Feb 17, 2020 10:07 AM
Hugh Johnson: Another FDR Thug

Source: AP Photo

President Roosevelt, as I have previously noted here, here, and here, was a presidential thug and ran his administration like a dictator. As is typical of such men, he also brought men of ill-temperament and brutal tactics into his administration.

Hugh Johnson, one of Roosevelt’s former speechwriters, also purposely invoked Christianity as a leverage tool to push the NRA:

Johnson loved to use religious metaphors, especially when speaking about the “Holy Thing” which was the NRA, “the Greatest Social Advance Since the Days of Jesus Christ.”  He compared his critics to “Judases” and responded to complaints by writing, “I often think of Moses.  His NRA was a code of only ten short articles and according to latest reports it isn’t working perfect even yet – after some 4,000 years of trial and error and even after the great reorganization of the years 30 to 34 A.D.”[1]

Hugh Johnson was nothing less than a crude ruffian who was “emotional and impetuous.” “He was a boisterous, hard-drinking man with a cigarette on one side of his mouth and profanities often coming from the other side,” and “[l]ike Roosevelt, Johnson failed in his business ventures during the 1920s.”[2] In fact, according to Dr. Folsom, “Even economist John Maynard Keynes, who often advocated massive government intervention, disagreed with Johnson.”[3]

[1] Marvin N. Olasky, 1987, Corporate Public Relations: A New Historical Perspective, (Hillsdale, NJ: LEA Publishers), p. 74.  Johnson’s comments are also referenced in Burton W. Folsom, Jr., 2008, New Deal or Raw Deal?  How FDR’s Economic Legacy has Damaged America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 45.

[2] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., 2008, New Deal or Raw Deal?  How FDR’s Economic Legacy has Damaged America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 45.

[3] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., 2008, New Deal or Raw Deal?  How FDR’s Economic Legacy has Damaged America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 45.