FDR Takes Lessons From Wilson

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Posted: Feb 10, 2020 10:40 AM
FDR Takes Lessons From Wilson

Source: AP Photo/Craig uttle

President Woodrow Wilson directly attacked citizens on pricing; for example, the seizure of property such as  eggs, sugar, dry salt pork, salmon, and pig’s ears, when the stores would not agree “to sell them at a ‘reasonable’ price and under the watchful eye of a federal officer.”[1]  Progressives always lead to tyranny.

Additionally, executive orders would make it a crime to produce, sell, and ship products like aviation fuel without approval of the Director of the Office of Petroleum Coordination (OPC). The Office of Production Management (OPM), by executive order, controlled “essential” civilian production and wartime production. Of course, the government -- that is, FDR -- determined what was essential.[2] America was completely under the foot of tyranny.

According to his son, Elliott, FDR also used the IRS for political purposes to destroy or damage those he viewed as his political enemies.[3]  “My father,” Elliott Roosevelt observed of his famous parent, “may have been the originator of the concept of employing the IRS as a weapon of political retribution.”[4]

As is the case with most dictators, nemeses became paranoid. Roosevelt was not only a threat to those against him but he also extended crafty tricks, such as wiretapping, to his supporters and friends.[5]

FDR’s son John declared, “Hell, my father just about invented bugging. [He] had them spread all over, and thought nothing of it.”[6] FDR had utterly no regard for the law and would become angry and agitated when his advisors would mention the illegality of his actions to him. As the Folsoms tragically write, “FDR amazed friends and enemies alike by his willingness to break laws and bend the Constitution.”[7]  FDR was not mentally sound, nor did he care. Unsurprisingly, he had no empathy for the law or people.

[1] James Grant, 2014, The Forgotten Depression:  1921, The Crash that Cured Itself, (New York, NY: Simon & Schuster), p. 24.

[2] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom, 2011, FDR Goes to War:  How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 120.

[3] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom, 2011, FDR Goes to War:  How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 187.

[4] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom, 2011, FDR Goes to War:  How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), Chapter 10, pp. 211-229.

[5] For examples see Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom, 2011, FDR Goes to War:  How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), pp. 217-218.

[6] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom, 2011, FDR Goes to War:  How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 212.

[7] Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom, 2011, FDR Goes to War:  How Expanded Executive Power, Spiraling National Debt, and Restricted Civil Liberties Shaped Wartime America, (New York, NY: Threshold Editions), p. 211.