Becoming A Shadow Of The U.S.S.R.

|
Posted: Dec 16, 2019 11:24 AM
Becoming A Shadow Of The U.S.S.R.

Source: AP Photo/Craig Ruttle

In my previous article, Give Us a Marxist King: FDR, I discussed how America in the 1940s paralleled the Israelites of demanding a king-like figure, Franklin Roosevelt, to rule over them and save them. This was a president who literally articulated a policy plan nearly taken from Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto.

Roosevelt had this progressive-Marxist lean since even his first run for the presidency in 1932. During a campaign speech at the California Commonwealth Club, FDR revealed his contempt for the Great Experiment and individual liberty, and his tyrannical vision of the federal government. FDR paralleled Woodrow Wilson’s statist view of the all-powerful administrative State. Roosevelt stated that:

In many instances the victory of the central Government, the creation of a strong central Government, was a haven of refuge to the individual…something that society needed and very much wanted, a strong central State able to keep the peace, to stamp out civil war, to put the unruly nobleman in his place, and to permit the bulk of individual to live safely.[1]

Woodrow Wilson, elected in 1912, saw the situation more clearly.  Where [Thomas] Jefferson had feared the encroachment of political power on the lives of individuals, Wilson knew that the new power was financial [within the private sector].  He saw, in the highly centralized economic system [of the private sector], the despot of the twentieth century, on whom great masses of individuals relied for their safety and their livelihood, and whose irresponsibility and greed (if they were not controlled) would reduce them to starvation and penury.[2]

It is the soberer, less dramatic business of administering resources and plants already in hand, of seeking to reestablish foreign markets for our surplus production, of meeting the problem of underconsumption, of adjusting production to consumption, of distributing wealth and products more equitably, of adapting existing economic organizations to the service of the people.  The days of enlightened administration has come.[3]

Roosevelt’s rhetoric echoed many historical tyrants who commonly claim that the individual must be protected by a strong centralized government managing the economy and private businesses; otherwise their freedom will be in jeopardy, as well as disparaging private enterprise as the source of greed and oppression. This claim was in complete contrast to American Exceptionalism.

Eerily, but not surprisingly, Roosevelt’s Second Bill of Rights reflected many of the rights listed in the Soviet Union’s constitution. Such as:

Article 118. Citizens of the U.S.S.R. have the right to work, that is, are guaranteed the right to employment and payment for their work…

Article 119. Citizens of the U.S.S.R. have the right to rest and leisure.

Article 120. Citizens of the U.S.S.R. have the right to maintenance in old age and also in case of sickness or loss of capacity to work.  This right is ensured by the extensive development of a social insurance of workers and employees at state expenses, free medical service for the working people and the provision of a wide network of health resorts for the use of the working people.

Article 121. Citizens of the U.S.S.R. have the right to education.  This right is ensured by universal, compulsory elementary education; by education, including higher education, being free of charge; by the system of state stipends for the overwhelming majority of students in the universities and colleges…

Article 122. Women in the U.S.S.R. are accorded equal rights with men in all spheres of economic, state, cultural, social and political life.[4]

It establishes the state as the keeper of people’s rights, which of course is the collectivist-statist mindset; and one of which is prevalent in collectivist-statist of the United States of the 20th and 21st centuries. It states that,

 “The Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Bolsheviks), which is the vanguard of the working people in their struggle and development in the socialist system and is the leading core of all organizations of the working people, both public and state.”[5]

Whether conscious of it or not, Roosevelt desired power and rule over the economy, and therefore, the citizens of the United States. This U.S.S.R. constitution is exactly the push of “rights” which has plagued the 20th century, and now into the 21st century. It is the antithesis of the principles of America. Man is given his rights by God, the Creator, not by other men; this is Natural Law.

[1] Franklin D. Roosevelt, September 23, 1932, New Conditions Impose New Requirements upon Government and Those Who Conduct Government,” (Campaign Address on Progressive Government at the Commonwealth Club: San Francisco, CA), in Samuel Irving Rosenman, ed., 1938, The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Vol. 1, (New York, NY: Russell & Russell), p. 744, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/p/ppotpus?type=bib&q1=roosevelt%2C+franklin&rgn1=author&op2=and&q2=&rgn2=author&op3=and&q3=&rgn3=author&Submit=Search].

[2] Franklin D. Roosevelt, September 23, 1932, “New Conditions Impose New Requirements upon Government and Those Who Conduct Government,” (Campaign Address on Progressive Government at the Commonwealth Club: San Francisco, CA), in Samuel Irving Rosenman, ed., 1938, The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Vol. 1, (New York, NY: Russell & Russell), p. 749, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/p/ppotpus?type=bib&q1=roosevelt%2C+franklin&rgn1=author&op2=and&q2=&rgn2=author&op3=and&q3=&rgn3=author&Submit=Search].

[3] Franklin D. Roosevelt, September 23, 1932, “New Conditions Impose New Requirements upon Government and Those Who Conduct Government,” (Campaign Address on Progressive Government at the Commonwealth Club: San Francisco, CA), in Samuel Irving Rosenman, ed., 1938, The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Vol. 1, (New York, NY: Russell & Russell), pp. 751-752, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/p/ppotpus?type=bib&q1=roosevelt%2C+franklin&rgn1=author&op2=and&q2=&rgn2=author&op3=and&q3=&rgn3=author&Submit=Search].

[4] “Chapter X: Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizens,” Adopted December 1936, 1936 Constitution of the USSR, [http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/russian/const/36cons04.html#chap10].

[5] “Chapter X: Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizens, Article 126” Adopted December 1936, 1936 Constitution of the USSR, [http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/russian/const/36cons04.html#chap10].