Michael Schaus

Las Vegas will run out of water. Maybe. Probably. Ya know: eventually. (I suddenly feel like quoting Keynes: “In the long run, we’re all dead.”) Lake Mead, which provides Sin City with 90 percent of its water supply, is slowly drying up as the city tries to weather a 14 year drought. The Telegraph recently ran a story that warned about the precarious future of Lake Mead and (by extension) Las Vegas; and it immediately caught my attention.

Bugsy Siegel’s dream in the desert is, apparently, on the road to dehydration if it doesn’t change something. At least, that’s the message made clear by Nick Allen for the Telegraph. As the drought drags on, the city continues to expand – putting a distinct strain on the lake. That dwindling body of water behind Hoover Dam, as it turns out, is quickly reverting back to the dry desert canyon it was before we built a concrete wall named after some crummy President.

Well… At least that’s the narrative. And, as strange as it might seem, the narrative isn’t new. I mean, it kinda makes sense for water to be a primary concern in the middle of the Nevada desert; but the story seemed oddly familiar as I skimmed it for details. In fact, it is remarkably similar to a story ran in 2010 by the New York Times. The water levels, the projected date of hydraulic Armageddon, and even the concerns over population expansion were almost identical to the New York Times article from nearly a half-decade earlier.

But, c’mon: That doesn’t mean there isn’t a legitimate concern over the water supply for Sin City. Right? After all, we are talking about a booming city in a naturally water-less corner of the US… So is there really a problem? Well… Yeah. I mean, probably:


Michael Schaus

Michael Schaus is the Associate Editor for Townhall Finance, and the Executive Producer for Ransom Notes Radio. He is a former talk show host and political activist. Having worked in fields ranging from construction to financial investment, his perspectives and world views are forged with a deep understanding of what it means to be an American.