Michael Schaus

With the unfolding implosion of Barack Obama’s foreign policy, it is almost easy to lose sight of the events that hit a little closer to home. While the national display of Liberalism’s failure has been pretty apparent for the last few years (an anemic economic “recovery”, corruption at the IRS, a foreign policy doctrine written in crayon, et al), the local level often offers a little more clarity on failed leftist policy.

Over Father’s Day weekend, 27 more people were the victims of “gun violence” in that gun-free zone known as Chicago. Rahm Emanuel’s city, sadly, should be pleased with the number. Some prior weekends this year have seen victims of gun violence reach almost double that figure. Two people died from their wounds, with 25 others suffering from close encounters with mostly gang-related violence.

Chicago’s now infamous failure to stem gun crime is more than just a symptom of misapplied gun control policies. The city’s decades long struggle with violence, poverty, and gang activity (after all, guns don’t cause violence all by themselves) is the consequence of institutionalized Liberalism. The city is quickly spending itself into a Detroit-style crises; entitlement programs and impressively punitive taxes have helped to expand income inequality throughout the city; overspending and cronyism with Teacher Unions have led to one of the most over-paid, and under-performing, school districts in the nation; and the political climate is so corrupt that it has become a national punchline.

In other words: Chicago’s woes are not merely the consequence of circumstances… These are the symptoms of Liberalism. Simply put, big government begets big corruption. And rather than institute policies that are aimed at lifting the poor from poverty or curbing lawlessness, initiatives are routinely put in place by city officials that are solely designed to reward leftist political allies.


Michael Schaus

Michael Schaus is the Associate Editor for Townhall Finance, and the Executive Producer for Ransom Notes Radio. He is a former talk show host and political activist. Having worked in fields ranging from construction to financial investment, his perspectives and world views are forged with a deep understanding of what it means to be an American.