Michael Schaus
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Union groups are ramping up for “massive” strikes at Walmart this Black Friday. If prior years are any indication of the group’s projected success this year, we can expect a handful of union thugs showing up at a handful of Walmart stores, with a few mass-printed signs. According to the Daily Caller: OUR Walmart, a close affiliate of the massive United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW), is threatening the big-box chain with “crippling” strikes and “angry crowds” during next week’s crucial Black Friday sale, unless the company raises worker wages.

Before diving into the lunacy of the left-wing labor group’s demand for higher wages, let me say upfront I am no fan of America’s busiest shopping day.

In fact, I hate Black Friday. Under normal circumstances, I would rather grind sand paper against my forehead than stand in line with thousands of people for 50 percent off a flat screen television. Being forced to interact with the lunacy, hostility, and rabid bargain-grabbing would only serve to erase the feelings of thanks and goodwill built up by the prior day’s over indulgence in turkey and cranberry relish.

And yet, not an ounce of my angst for Black Friday is rooted in an objection to corporatism or profiteering. I love making money. I love it when other people make money. Heck, I even like spending money. . . I just don’t like crowds. But then I hear about people who hate Black Friday just as much as I do, because they feel sorry for the retail workers. Apparently, I am supposed to hate Black Friday for the same reason that OUR Walmart hates corporate America: “Businesses put profits before people.”

Yeah . . . It’s not a whole lot of fun working the day after Thanksgiving. But there is nothing intrinsically evil about a corporation’s desire to make money on socially “inconvenient” days. After all, there is a reason businesses are opening at 3:00 AM on Black Friday (or 11:00 PM Thanksgiving Day). . . It’s because there is, apparently, a demand for manic shopping sprees. Consumer demand always wins the day because, in the end, they keep the rest of the world employed.

Which brings us to the issue of Walmart, and their union opponents. While the Union activists like to berate Walmart executives, and decry their “corporatist” greed, they overlook the two most important contributing factors to low wages: Consumers, and employees.

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Michael Schaus

Michael Schaus is the Associate Editor for Townhall Finance, and the Executive Producer for Ransom Notes Radio. He is a former talk show host and political activist. Having worked in fields ranging from construction to financial investment, his perspectives and world views are forged with a deep understanding of what it means to be an American.