Michael Schaus
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Earlier this week McClatchy News service had a headline that simply stated there were “Many in [the] Middle East struggling to understand Obama’s Syria policy.” Yep. . . It turns out America and the Middle East finally have some common ground. The President’s childish attempt to behave like a grown-up-President is bound to perpetuate violence, achieve little (or nothing) in regards to Foreign Security, and send all the wrong messages to the thugs, supremacists and terrorist organizations that would like to do America and her allies harm.

While America is preparing to conduct limited strikes in Syria (with no intention of toppling the current regime, building a friendly government, or alleviating the ongoing threat to Israel) Libya is falling into chaos, Afghanistan is being taken over by the Taliban, Egypt struggles with their second coup in as many years, increased terrorist bombings in Iraq threaten to plunge the region into further chaos, and the country that housed Osama Bin Laden’s retirement home (Pakistan) seems to breeding more terrorist sympathizers than Obama’s drones can strike down.

Before some bipartisan committee that can’t say no to humanitarian military intervention, Kerry and Obama insisted we come to the aid of Al Qaida sponsored rebel forces. Without UN approval, without the cooperation of the 40 countries that joined America’s invasion of Iraq, and without a much criticized Collin Powell power-point presentation, the Administration called for Military action. And the Middle East – like most of Europe – seems to have some confusion about a nuanced and schizophrenic history of American intervention in the region. After all, the President’s history on Middle East Policy is more perplexing than John Kerry being for Bush’s Iraq War before he was against it.

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Michael Schaus

Michael Schaus is the Associate Editor for Townhall Finance, and the Executive Producer for Ransom Notes Radio. He is a former talk show host and political activist. Having worked in fields ranging from construction to financial investment, his perspectives and world views are forged with a deep understanding of what it means to be an American.