Marita Noon
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The Republican National Convention in Tampa displayed a large “debt clock” that ticked away at a rate of $10 million a minute, keeping the nation’s dire financial straits front and center. Had there been a companion counter with a chit mark for each time the word “jobs” was mentioned from the main stage, it likely would have clicked on at a similar pace.

This week, at the Democratic National Convention the word “jobs” is sure to, once again, be a popular topic.

As Vice President Biden famously said, referencing the number one issue facing the middle class, “it happens to be, as Barack says, a three-letter word: jobs. J-O-B-S.”

That “three-letter word” may be the only thing the two parties agree on—and how each would get there is totally different.

In Tampa, Romney said: “What is needed in our country today is not complicated or profound. It doesn't take a special government commission to tell us what America needs. What America needs is jobs. Lots of jobs. … I am running for president to help create a better future. A future where everyone who wants a job can find one. Where no senior fears for the security of their retirement. An America where every parent knows that their child will get an education that leads them to a good job and a bright horizon. And unlike the President, I have a plan to create 12 million new jobs. It has 5 steps. First, by 2020, North America will be energy independent by taking full advantage of our oil and coal and gas and nuclear and renewables.” (Italics added.)

The Romney plan starts with another word we are hearing, and will continue to hear, a lot of: “energy.”

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Marita Noon

Marita Noon is Executive Director of Energy Makes America Great.