John Ransom

The saddest thing about a guy like Obama, as opposed to say, Bill Clinton, is that if you went forward in time and showed him all his mistakes, showed him an alternate vision-- one that's successful for the country-- he is such an ideologue that he would reject the advice out of hand.

But still that doesn’t mean that I won’t share the five things Obama could do to turn the country and the economy around.

Some of these are things anyone could do. OK, anyone but Obama:

    1) Negotiate with Republicans on Obamacare—This signature piece of legislation is going down and it's taking Democrats with them. Obama actually holds most of the cards and would put the GOP in a tough spot if he offered concessions. Obama runs the risk of looking like the bitter clinger he always accuses the rest of us being. But Obama won’t negotiate because Obama’s never wrong about anything. That’s what his mom said anyway.

    2 ) Fold Up Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank— The banking industry doesn’t lack for regulation. It lacks for the right type of regulation. Sarbanes Oxley was supposed to fix fraud at publicly traded companies. Dodd-Frank was supposed end too big to fail. Both pieces of legislation fail at their primary mission and make Wall Street more complicated. It’s time for a bipartisan effort that deleverages Washington in Wall Street and Wall Street in Washington. You want to clean up money in politics? Then give financial companies less reason to donate money. Give them more reason to stick to their customers rather than lobbying to do in the competition. Pass bipartisan reform that permanently keeps Wall Street and Washington away from each other and really reforms financial services.

    3) Approve the Keystone Pipeline— The Keystone pipeline isn’t about Canadian tar sand oil, it’s about opening the U.S. to further development of light, tight oil and gas. While it’s estimated that Canada may have as much as 2 trillion barrels of oil in reserves, “the U.S. Geological Survey estimates the [US] has 4.3 trillion barrels of in-place oil shale resources centered in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, said Helen Hankins, Colorado director for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management” according to the Associated Press.

    4.3 trillion barrels is 16 times the reserves of Saudi Arabia, or enough oil to supply the US for 600 years.


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.
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