John Ransom

The gnashing of teeth and pulling of hair now evident amongst the talkers and the chattering class about the newest budget deal is more proof that our constitution still works, even if imperfectly.

I know that many of you have heard that the constitution was outdated, a relic of old white men, not suited for today’s hyper-partisanship. Some of you have even predicted the demise of the Republic.

The only thing hyper right now is the hyperventilating of people like David Brooks, the EEOC’s pick for token Republican at the New York Times.

Brooks is upset because the poor people at the Congressional Budget Office have to work so hard analyzing bills, when after all, so few bills are passed into law.

“It’s possible that years will go by without the passage of a major piece of legislation. Meanwhile,” Brooks continues, “Washington nearly strangles on a gnat, like this week’s teeny budget compromise.”

What Brooks sees as a drawback, I see as a benefit.

You see, I for one am a bit more sanguine about the survival of the country, in part, because of the budget deal.

The sad truth is that Republicans and Democrats in Congress got the best budget deal that they were able to.

Neither side has the muscle, under our constitution, to get the kind of deal that they’d like. After the bruising that Republicans took over the shutdown—a shutdown that I supported—and the bruising that Democrats are taking on Obamacare, both sides felt it a necessary evil to put on their “statesmanship” hat for a moment, because frankly, many of them are up for reelection.

With approval ratings hovering in the teens for Congress and an all time low for the president, compromise is the inevitable result. You don’t have to agree with the compromise to understand it.

Even more, this is how our founders intended the government to work. For all of you who cry "What about the constitution?" Compromise and slow change is how the constitution works.


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.