John Ransom

Economists and media types- same thing really, they just took different AP classes in high school- are again using the old “soft patch” excuse to explain away the inexplicable failure of the Obama administration to look after job creation in the United States. 

"It is reflective of the continuation of the soft patch that the economy has been going through, but looking forward it seems that we're starting to gain a little bit of traction,” Russell Price, a senior economist at Ameriprise Financial told NBCNews.

Traction would be a welcome relief from the Un-urgent Care the economy is receiving under Obama.

Traction would at least be an admission that something is badly broken with the economy. Traction would at least be some treatment of the illness.

Because, I’m starting to get the impression that what ails the economy is a disorder that won’t be covered under the administration’s universal healthcare program- kind of like lung transplant for kids ten years old and younger.

Some live, some die, some just get laid-off FOREVER.

“Sorry, we finally read the stimulus bill and guess what? JOBS WEREN’T COVERED,” I expect White House Press Jester Jay Carney to say any day now. “We didn’t plan it that way,” he’ll add, “we’re just stupid.”

That seems to be the standard, daily excuse coming from the White House. 

Employment numbers released this week show that unemployment claims were down moderately week-over-week, but still remain too high to put a dent in real joblessness in America.

“Claims have been volatile in recent weeks,” reports Reuters, “but there is little in the numbers to suggest a shift in the moderate pace of job gains, even though the broader economy is struggling under the weight of higher taxes.”

Unemployment and underemployment is anything but “moderate,” officially standing at about 14 percent as of last month. But here’s real killer, as our own Mike Shedlock has observed:

?  In the last year, those "not" in the labor force rose by 1,604,000

?  Over the course of the last year, the number of people employed rose by 1,645,000


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.