John Ransom

Moonbat Exterminator wrote: JR, your assertion that computing a single number for the average temperature of the planet is mathematically impossible is incorrect. It would in fact be a simple, straightforward calculation. In statistics, it's called the mean of sampling means. The weakness of such a statistic is that the enormous variability in the data far exceeds the variability in that number. Even the 90 % confidence interval would be much larger than the variations in that average, making it useless from a practical standpoint. - Al Gore Warming

Dear Moon,

I think we are talking about two different things, but your post actually proves my point.

I live in Colorado where temperatures can vary quite a bit from place to place, even covering only short distances.

I drove about 5 miles yesterday and experienced a temperature difference of about 7 degrees Fahrenheit. And that’s not because of huge altitude differences.

Unless you can account for those differences everywhere, and map them according to the area occupied for each temperature, which you can’t possibly do, there is no real average temperature for the planet. Not one that has any real significance.

The larger point, which I think we both agree on, is that for purposes of global warming, no actual “average” temperature has been calculated that’s meaningful in the debate.    



hal_incandeza wrote: "In May of 2012, the Heartland Institute hosted its biggest ever- and seventh ever-International Conference on Climate Change..."

Right, that's why they are discontinuing their conference for lack of funding. What a great success.

Dear Comrade Hal,

Your comment would be interesting if it was actually true.

But like a lot of things that liberals talk about it’s not accurate; wishful thinking maybe, but not correct.


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.