John Ransom

Here’s a lesson to the Hackers for the 99%: You’re not anonymous once you get caught.

And you’ll always get caught, because, um, the internet was designed by the Department of Defense. And that’s a group that doesn’t want anyone to remain anonymous for long. 

In fact, they are so good at tracking people down-with extreme prejudice- that they can make sure a very large bomb fits in a very tiny place.

But that’s not your biggest problem.

No your biggest problem is that hubris led you to a confrontation with Mexican drug lords who have all sorts of contacts in some of the smallest places in America- prisons. And that is where you are likely headed.   What part of "don't steal from drug lords" don't you get?  Didn't you see the movie Midnight Run?  



So it goes with hacking kingpin and left-wing computer community organizer Jeremy Hammond of – surprise!- Chicago, who was arrested this week, along with 4 compatriots, after eight months of FBI surveillance into the inner workings of the internet theft group commonly known as Anonymous. As a result, Hammond and his friends now face the prospect of spending a great deal of time in a very tiny place with bars on it.   

Often dressed in black and wearing the mask of Guy Fawkes as its symbol, the hacking-activist group of the Occupy Wall Street crowd broke into intelligence agencies, banks and corporate servers in search of embarrassing information, as well as digging for digital plunder in the form of credit card digits- which they promptly charged for “charities.”

But six months ago, it all started to unravel for the hackers.  

The virtual stakeout of Anonymous started in August of 2011 when the most anonymous of all hacking kingpins, “Hector Xavier Monsegur, of New York, pleaded guilty …to computer hacking charges and [started] helping law enforcement officials with their investigation [into Anonymous], authorities revealed,” reports the Chicago Tribune


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.