John Ransom
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I’m going to skip the nonsensical projections regarding what the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. would think about today’s topical issues like Occupy Wall Street, so-called income inequality and Tim Tebow.

I can afford to do this because another man named King has already instructed me on his views.

Bob King, head of the United Auto Worker’s Union, got together with 500 of his fellow travelers over the weekend in a vanity-channeling of Dr. King by praising Occupy Wall Street and the UAW’s largest shareholder, Barrack Obama. 

In this, King (Bob) seems to be operating out of a liberal playbook that looks to associate Occupy with King (Martin Luther).

It’s called “Occupy the Dream.”

I’m not sure if the irony is intentional or just accidental.

"So much of what he says is the same today, is about the world today," said King on King “We're at very difficult times in the United States of America right now. We're at a time of great injustice and growing injustices. Thank God for the occupy movement and the young kids that are out there."

Bob King has seen the past and tells us that the past is our future.

Our future is one where inequality is everywhere more relentless; where progress on issues, like racial equality is just a chimera, even as an African American sits in the White House.

He has to tell us that, this King named Bob does.

Even more, he needs for us to believe it, because without that belief, he’s a man without a job, as even he admits.

King (V.2.0) has placed a big bet that Americans not as familiar with him as the people he represents have bought into his rhetoric about inequality, especially as it pertains to income. His organization, the UAW, has been losing members, dollars and assets for decades as workers and consumers have repeatedly rejected the union label.

According to Reuters, the UAW has already had to “sell assets and dip into its strike fund to pay for its activities.”

In fact King (Bob) thinks that if he can’t win converts soon, there is no future for his union. "I have said that repeatedly, and I believe it.”

It’s a measure of the UAW’s desperation that King has pinned his hopes on Occupy and Obama, two movements that, like the UAW, seem to be tracking in the wrong direction from Main Street American thought.

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John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.