John Ransom

Liberals are getting pretty desperate on the global warming/climate change debate.

But you have to give them high marks for creativity. As one of our contributors Marita Noon mentioned the other day, enviros are switching to supposed health risks associated with fossil fuels since politicians and the general public don’t buy the carbon-hates-us argument anymore.   

And lacking little evidence that many of the natural disasters that were predicted by the global warming “model” that the high priests of their religion constructed years ago, one economist has come up with a new disaster, this one wholly civil. And the media are climbing aboard the bandwagon like a high speed rail car powered by solar energy.  

Citing wars in Burundi, Chad, the Dominican Republic, Indonesia, Peru, the Comoros, Congo, Eritrea, Niger and Rwanda, economist Solomon Hsiang of Columbia University argues, according to Scientific American, that they all have one thing in common: They all happened when “global climate was enduring El Nino” according to research the economist published in Nature, a sister publication to Scientific American.

Enduring El Nino. Got it. A new buzz phrase. Kind of like Enduring O’Bama another predictable burst of hot, moist gas.

Hsiang will probably get a government grant on the strength of the paper if he didn’t already have one. Or maybe a Nobel prize.   

In the interest of full disclosure I worked for Nature Biotechnology covering the finance side of the biotech industry.  Nature, Nature Biotechnology and Scientific American are all owned by Macmillan.  

"Since 1950, one out of five civil conflicts have been influenced by El Niño," says Hsiang. "This represents the first major evidence that global climate is a major factor in organized patterns of violence."

Wow that’s pretty major. And also wrong.

Chad’s been at war since it gained independence from France in 1960. The Congo has been in a civil war for fifteen years.  Rwanda has been at war internally off- and mostly on- since 1959; Eritrea has had wars, civil wars, border disputes, revolution and secession since the 1950s.


John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.