John Ransom
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The Obama Administration continued its war on American jobs this week by employing more Orwellian rhetoric than a Menshevik at a party congress. I wish they could show as much energy in prosecuting wars in Afghanistan or Libya as they have in the war on American jobs.

"The president believes, we believe, that there are enough members of both parties in both houses who support the idea that a big deal has to be balanced and therefore include spending cuts in the tax code," Carney said according to the Associated Press “employing a phrase White House officials use to describe ending tax loopholes and tax subsidies for certain taxpayers and corporations.”

“Spending cuts in the tax code?”

That’s the Menshevik-in-chief’s code for tax increases. Is it any wonder that the newest jobs report was such a stinkbomb? About the only people who don't seem to understand what's going in the economy is the Flat Earth Society at the White House. 

It's bad enough that top Obama advisor David Plouffe thinks unemployment isn't important to citizens. It's another thing for the president's economic czar Austan Goolsbee to claim the US is not facing another recession while  trying to raise taxes on Main Street, especially in light of the jobs report.

Like all tax increases in this administration, the one they’re talking about now is a “targeted” tax increase. They are targeted a you pocketbook and your job.  

The presidential candidate who once promised that he’d never, ever raise taxes on anyone making less than $250,000 has become the president who has proposed another set of tax increases that will be felt most acutely by the poor and the middle class.

This tax increase is on oil. And by "oil," I mean you.

You’ll feel it at the pump eventually and in the unemployment line.

The administration contends that they just want to close loopholes. But the Heritage Foundation says that some of those proposals unfairly single out the oil industry.

For example, the oil industry “already faces a higher marginal tax rate at 41 percent compared to 26 percent for the rest of businesses in Standard & Poor’s 500,” according to Heritage, and that doesn’t include the sales taxes that are imposed at the state and local level.

The administration is also trying to repeal some commonplace tax deductions that encourage investment in new capital and jobs here in the US.

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John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.