John Ransom
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If some think that Donald Trump and Mitt Romney best represent the hopes of Wall Street for America, some think that if Herman Cain is elected president he will best represent the interests of Main Street.

Cain is the host of “The Herman Cain Show” broadcast out of Atlanta, although he’s taken a hiatus from the show as he explores a run for the White House.

Cain is also a retired C-level executive who’s worked for Pillsbury, Coca-Cola, Burger King and Godfather’s Pizza. He’s known as a hands-on manager, who is not afraid to get into the details of business. In fact, he’s always insisted in learning whatever business he’s working for from the ground up.

While Cain is not a candidate for president yet- he’s still in the exploratory stage- Cain already has a program that he thinks can put Americans back to work while getting rid of the reckless and wasteful spending in Washington. In doing so, Cain hopes to start a revival of American business that will bring to Main Street real, high-paying jobs. 

“The current administration’s hostility towards the job creators of America, from small businesses to our biggest corporations,” Cain told Townhall Finance, “is based on the fact that only 7 percent of President Obama’s administration has ever held a job in the private sector.”

The results have skewed America government ideologically, which has become fundamentally hostile to business. The result is that taxpayers and middle-Americans get squeezed in both their paychecks and their wallets.   

“Their agenda and its resulting legislation has created higher taxes, more regulation,” says Cain about the Obama progressives, “and more uncertainty that hinders job growth and economic recovery.”

Cain says he would use smarter tax policies, establish accountability in government and lower the regulatory burden that kills job creation in the U.S in order to lead an American renaissance.

For example, federal tax law penalizes U.S. companies that decide to bring overseas profits back to the U.S.

As the Wall Street Journal pointed out last fall: “This means that U.S. companies can, without significant consequence, use their foreign earnings to invest in any country in the world—except here.”

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John Ransom

John Ransom is the Finance Editor for Townhall Finance.