David Sterman
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The two companies poised to benefit from this technology upgrade: RF Micro Devices (Nasdaq: RFMD) and Skyworks Solutions (Nasdaq: SWKS).

These companies have the same growth opportunity: They each supply communications chips to leading smartphone and tablet makers, and each has refreshed their product lines to handle the burgeoning WiFi 802.11ac market. This technology actually requires a higher number of communications chips, as it can better identify the direction of the device catching the signal, and use multiple antennas to focus the signal in that direction, rather than omnidirectionally, as previous versions of WiFi have done.

It's not as simple as building a WiFi chip. These firms actually sell a range of radio-frequency (RF) chips, handling tasks such as switching, filtering, power amplification, low-noise amplification. These chips use gallium arsenide (GaAs) rather than silicon, thanks to the material's ability work efficiently at higher frequencies. So companies such as RF Micro Devices and Skyworks don't have to duke it out at the low end of the chip-making process chain, as GaAs development requires a higher level of expertise.

My colleague Jim Woods recently noted that Skyworks is well-positioned to ride herd on Apple's (Nasdaq: AAPL) sales growth, as Skyworks' chips are finding home in an increasing number of Apple's products. Skyworks is well-trenched with Samsung, Qualcomm (Nasdaq: QCOM) and others as well. 

Since Jim profiled Skyworks, shares have slipped almost 10%, and now look very attractively valued at around 10 times fiscal (September) 2013 forecasts.

Shares of Skyworks surged toward the $30 mark this past summer on expectations of yet further share gains in the RF space, which by some estimates, had approached 40%. Yet as Jim noted, concerns about Skyworks' role in the new Apple iPhone 5 have knocked the stock down, even as those fears appear misplaced.

A half-decade ago, RF Micro was the industry darling with leading market share (which ultimately peaked at 36%). RF Micro's market share has since fallen by half, largely because the company was closely aligned with Nokia (NYSE: NOK), which was eventually eclipsed by Apple and Samsung.

Yet RF Micro has a good shot of taking back market share in coming quarters, if its "PowerSmart" approach takes root. This is RF Micro's all-in-one approach to RF chip sets, which enables customers to buy one integrated chip solution, rather than try to cobble together chips from various vendors. (Skyworks' chips, for example, work in tandem with chips offered by Intel (Nasdaq: INTC) and Qualcomm). Analysts have been steadily raising their fiscal (March) 2013 and 2014 sales and profit forecasts for RF Micro, thanks in part to the looming WiFi upgrade cycle.

Risks to Consider: The wireless telecom sector will benefit from a solid upgrade cycle -- if consumers are feeling flush. Recent signs are encouraging, but an economic slowdown may slow the uptake of discretionary electronic devices.

Action to Take --> Skyworks Solutions and RF Micro are just two beneficiaries of this WiFi upgrade cycle. Other stocks for further research include Triquint Semicinductor (Nasdaq: TQNT), Netgear (Nasdaq: NTGR) and Broadcom (Nasdaq: BRCM).
 
David Sterman does not personally hold positions in any securities mentioned in this article.
StreetAuthority LLC owns shares of INTC, SWKS, QCOM in one or more of its “real money” portfolios. This article orginally appeared at StreetAuthority.com 
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David Sterman

David Sterman has worked as an investment analyst for nearly two decades. He is currently an analyst for StreetAuthority.com