Daniel J. Mitchell

It’s a challenge to be a libertarian in Washington because you have to swim against the tide.

The vast majority of people in town are looking for excuses to spend money and amass power, and a small band of us are trying to convince them that the federal government should be limited in size and scope.

It may seem like a hopeless task.

*Libertarians argue against big expensive entitlement programs like Medicaid, explaining that it’s not a proper function of the federal government.

*Libertarians argue against stupid little publicity stunts like steroid hearings, explaining that it’s not a proper function of the federal government.

*Libertarians argue against emotional gestures such as disaster relief, explaining that it’s not a proper function of the federal government.

*Libertarians argue against the entire Department of Transportation, explaining that it’s not a proper function of the federal government.

I could provide more examples, but you get the idea. It seems as if libertarians are stuck with a Sisyphean task, urging “no” in a town filled with people who want to say “yes.”

But I don’t think our work is hopeless. I’ve already shared many reasons to be hopeful, and we now have some new polling data that should make us more optimistic. According to the folks at Pew, Americans have very low opinions of the federal government.

Here are the key details from a Washington Post story about the poll.


Daniel J. Mitchell

Daniel J. Mitchell is a top expert on tax reform and supply-side tax policy at the Cato Institute.