More Entrepreneurs Say “Au Revoir” as they Escape France’s Confiscatory Tax Regime

Daniel J. Mitchell
Posted: Mar 14, 2013 12:01 AM

As a general rule, it’s not right to take pleasure at the misfortune of others.

But I think we’re allowed an exception to that Schadenfreude rule when the “others” are greedy politicians pursuing spiteful policies. We want the political elite to suffer misfortune because of our desire to promote freedom and prosperity for ordinary people.

With that in mind, I have a big smile on my face because Francois Hollande’s class-warfare tax policy in France is a bigger failure than even I predicted it would be.

I’m particularly happy that the geese with the golden eggs are flying away. And the flock seems to get bigger every day.

Here are some amusing excerpts from a story in the Financial Times.

New evidence of top French executives leaving the country has emerged as President Francois Hollande battles a stalling economy and tumbling approval ratings. Two senior executives at Moet Hennessy, the champagne and cognac arm of the LVMH luxury group, are moving to London from Paris and the head of Dassault Systemes, the software arm of Dassault Aviation, said some senior managers of his company had left and he was considering following suit. …The news follows Mr Arnault’s own application for Belgian citizenship, leaked last September, which poured fuel on a fiery debate in France about entrepreneurship, patriotism and high taxes.

Yup, just like Joe Biden, French politicians want people to think it’s patriotic to give more money to wasteful and incompetent politicians.

“I am the John Galt of France”

And then they have the gall (no pun intended) to complain when the intended victims decide they don’t want to cooperate in their own disembowelment.

You can see why I have a smile on my face.

While I’m happy that some people are escaping Hollande’s punitive tax grasp, there are plenty of victims that can’t escape. France’s economy is in the toilet and millions of ordinary people are suffering.

Figures released on Monday showing a worse-than-expected 1.2 per cent fall in industrial production in January over December underlined the grim outlook facing Mr Hollande, whose approval ratings have fallen this month to as low as 30 per cent. The economy went into reverse in the last quarter of 2012, unemployment has hit 10 per cent of the workforce

Not surprisingly, the politicians are not learning any lessons. They either have their heads buried in the sand or they lash out at those who offer constructive criticism.

The government has denied claims of a tax exodus and denounced as “French bashing” criticism such as the declaration last month by Maurice Taylor, head of tyremaker Titan International, that he would be “stupid” to buy a French factory.

Hollande and his cronies can pretend that successful taxpayers aren’t escaping, but reality will hit them over the head when they count how much tax revenue they receive this year and next year.

In other words, we’re going to see an interesting Laffer Curve experiment.

We saw in America that rich people paid a lot more to the IRS when Reagan lowered their tax rates in the 1980s.

Francois Hollande is trying to run the same experiment, only in reverse.

Anybody want to take a wild guess how that’s going to turn out?

P.S. As shown in this remarkable chart, the real problem in France is that government is far too big. And if the public sector is consuming more than 50 percent of a nation’s economic output, it’s impossible to have a good tax system.

Some big-government nations – such as Sweden and Denmark – try to minimize the damage of high tax burdens, but there’s no way to have a non-destructive tax system when the government wants to take half of what people produce.

And France is trying to maximize the pain rather than minimize the pain, so it’s a safe bet that Hollande’s policies won’t end well.

P.P.S. The debacle in France helps explain why we should celebrate tax competition. The fact that entrepreneurs can migrate to nations with better (or less worse) tax systems is a valuable way of penalizing politicians that impose bad policy.