Daniel J. Mitchell
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I have a new article for National Review about the fallout from the Supercommittee.

Among the points I make are:

o We were lucky to dodge a tax hike.

o There’s still a threat of a tax hike if big-government Republicans side with the so-called rational left in favor of a tax-increase proposal, such as Gang of Six, Simpson-Bowles, and Domenici-Rivlin.

o The sequester is a good outcome.

o Republicans who accept a tax hike to get entitlement cuts will wind up with bad policy that crowds out needed reforms.

I want to focus on this last point because it is critically important, but doesn’t get much attention. Here’s what I wrote for NRO.

…many Republicans (regardless of the no-tax-hike pledge) are susceptible to a deal so long as something is being done to address entitlement costs and so long as the tax hikes are not based on class-warfare ideology. …the real challenge for fiscal conservatives is figuring out how to adopt something akin to the Ryan budget. That means no tax increases, genuine spending cuts, and real entitlement reforms (i.e., not the policies promoted by the rational Left, such as unsustainable price controls or back-door tax hikes via means testing). Sadly, there is no way for such a budget to be enacted in 2011 or 2012. And it may not happen in the four years after that. That would be both frustrating and worrisome — particularly since every year of delay brings us closer to European-style fiscal chaos. But for fiscal conservatives there is no possible compromise with either the hard Left or the rational Left. Both of those camps want bigger government. Both want higher taxes. And both oppose real entitlement reform.

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Daniel J. Mitchell

Daniel J. Mitchell is a top expert on tax reform and supply-side tax policy at the Cato Institute.
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