Charles Payne

As a boxing fan, I thought Shannon Briggs was the second coming of Mike Tyson when I watched him fight in person at Madison Square Garden. He bolted off his stool to plummet his opponent within a minute of the opening round. This was a bad man! Alas, it was more about competition.

His opponent that night was a tomato can, and Briggs was 'not 'unstoppable, like a human-robot. I learned this a few fights later when he fought another would-be tomato can, and took a shot to the chops that busted his lip. Seeing his own blood for the first time sent Briggs, the 25 and 0 fighter (25 knockouts) reeling.

In fact, the shock of blood seemed more powerful than the blow that actually landed. Briggs was counted out in the third round of that fight. Although he would continue to fight, and continue to win championship belts later in his career, he was never the same fighter; and he never recaptured that facade of invincibility. To his credit, he took a savage beating in his last pro fight against Vitali Klitschko, which lasted 12 rounds, but he spent the next four weeks in intensive care.

Sturm & Drang

German for "Storm and Stress," was a movement from 1760 to 1780, among poets, philosophers, and composers that focused on the angst in life.

  • Storm: reflected nature's sublime power in inspiring the artist
  • Stress: the role of the emotions or the will in expressing the turmoil present in nature

I thought about Shannon Briggs and the Sturm & Drang movement, when I saw the Federal Reserve's assessment of too-big-to-fail banks. It might seem odd that a pro fighter that did not live up to the hype, and a short-term art movement which influenced timeless poems, as well as works from Mozart, have something in common. On the one hand, there is the pugilist that was a walking wall of granite, only to turn into clay after failing his first stress test. On the other hand, music and written words sought to reflect the agony of stress.

...Take a Punch?


Charles Payne

Charles V. Payne is a regular contributor to the Fox Business and Fox News Networks. He is also the Chief Executive Officer and Principle Analyst of Wall Street Strategies, Inc. (WSSI), founded in 1991 which provides subscription analytical services to both individual and institutional investors.