Charles Payne
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Does saying you thought the job would be easier make not succeeding more palatable?

I was on Sean Hannity's radio show yesterday, and the other guest kept repeating that somehow President Obama misjudged the depth of the recession that he was calling the worst since the Depression. I get that this kind of thing works with people that are only marginally attached to the news, politics and reality. In the real world, it's truly about accomplishments.

Two weeks of Olympic coverage underscores that success and failure can be measured in fractions of a second. The reward for coming in last is making it in the first place but there are no medals, no podium and no adoring crowds.

The world is celebrating victory. In fact, some are really celebrating winning in London by making it "rain" back home with Italy at $182,400, Russia at $135,000 and France $65,200.

As this earning season winds down, there's been something of a celebration for the rest of the world via US corporations that are selling them everything from washing machines to computers. But make no mistake, we are not finished. Make no mistake, we are still the best. Make no mistake, while we are not even scratching the surface of what we are and can be it's too early to write off the nation.



There is no doubt the economy is being held hostage, and we are in trouble, and while we are being told to accept this as the new normal or higher taxes will create a sustainable society where everything is fair because we will all be broke and broken. After coming so far so fast, this economy will resist crumbling as long as possible.

This is an economy already built to last!

I pity the fool...

It is one thing to be worried about the fate of the country, and it is another to promote the pity party that has been going on non-stop since 2008. I think one of the reasons for this is when we are sulking we make for easier dupes for those that will make the party last even longer. Misery loves company and nobody answers the call to join the ranks of doom and gloom like someone with a cloud over their head.

That part is slightly understandable. The thing that baffles me is that all the people with so much going for them from belief in God to accomplished careers to grand hopes for all the riches of life for their children and grandchildren. These folks should walk past the pity party without even hearing the music. Yes, they have reason to be despondent but to stick to their natural inclination to fight back not grab a violin.

The thing about these pity parties is once you succumb to the music, you don't want the music to stop. On the contrary, you just want more people to join the fun or misery. (Unless you sulk in silence and then you want universal misery but to watch it from your window.) It's time for people to fight the urge to join the pity party and, instead, fight for the economy and the greatness of the nation. Part of that is to see the elements of the past in the core of the economy now and not ignore it all simply out of frustration with the current occupant of White House or efforts to turn American into a pagan nation with limited ambition for prosperity.

There has never been an endeavor worth savoring that wasn't harder than we thought it would be going in.
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Charles Payne

Charles V. Payne is a regular contributor to the Fox Business and Fox News Networks. He is also the Chief Executive Officer and Principle Analyst of Wall Street Strategies, Inc. (WSSI), founded in 1991 which provides subscription analytical services to both individual and institutional investors.
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