Bob Goldman
Recommend this article

Well, I guess we have to face facts -- this Internet thing is going to be with us for a while.

Personally, I thought it was a fad, like lifetime employment or annual cost-of-living raises, but I'm afraid we're going to have to keep on keeping on our computers for a while, at least, until some super-smart company, like Apple used to be, brings back the ultimate form of communication -- two orange juice cans connected with a string.

And here's the worst part! Not content with sticking its digital nose into our search for a hot date, now the Internet wants to be involved when we look for a new job. Or so I recently learned in a Phyllis Korkki Workstation column in The New York Times.

"How to Say 'Look at Me!' to an Online Recruiter" makes it clear from the jump that "if you are thinking of looking for a job this year, or are already searching for one, be warned: the rules have changed."

Yes, it's true. Instead of the time-tested way of getting a new job -- asking Dad to hire you -- now you need an "Internet presence" so that employers, many of whom no longer post jobs, will find you as they search the Internet for the perfect employee. (Of course, Dad can find you without too much searching. You're sleeping on the couch in the family room until the economy catches up with your abilities.)

Fortunately, there is a surfeit of websites where you can promote your wares. The recruiters columnist Korkki recruited make it very clear that LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube are all places where you need to have your name up in lights, or, at least, in pixels.

Consider the musings of Alison Doyle, a job search specialist for About.com, who advises that "more companies are turning to Twitter as a way to broadcast job openings, so you should use it to follow recruiters, industry leaders and individual companies." Makes sense, but why settle for virtual following? Why not get yourself a trench coat and start following recruiters and industry leaders from the minute they leave their houses in the morning, to late at night, when they stumble home from the tavern. Sure, they may consider it stalking, and they probably will report you to police, but hey -- you did get noticed.

Speaking of getting noticed, this isn't easy to do on overpopulated sites, like Facebook, since experts like Ms. Doyle suggest that you "resolve to be thoroughly professional on Facebook at all times."

Recommend this article

Bob Goldman

Bob Goldman is a business humor writer.

Be the first to read Bob Goldman's column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com delivered each morning to your inbox.

TOWNHALL FINANCE DAILY

Get the best of Townhall Finance Daily delivered straight to your inbox

Follow Townhall Finance!